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The peasantry in the French Revolution

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Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [Cambridgeshire], New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • France

Subjects:

  • Peasantry -- France -- History -- 18th century,
  • Land tenure -- France -- History -- 18th century,
  • France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Causes,
  • France -- Economic conditions -- 18th century

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementP.M. Jones.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDC163 .J64 1988
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 306 p. :
Number of Pages306
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2031722M
ISBN 10052133070X, 052133716X
LC Control Number88007337

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  An uprising of the peasantry was not an assured matter. Lefebvre contends that without the king calling an Estates General they would not have moved at all (). But the fact that they did adds a fascinating and perhaps surprising feature to the French Revolution. Works Cited. LeFebvre, Georges. The Coming of the French Revolution. Trans.   This is undoubtedly the finest book to appear, so far, in English, in these busy commemorative years of the Revolution.' Douglas Johnson, The Times Educational Supplement "The quality of its scholarly research and its perceptive comparisons make this the best work on the role of peasantry in the French Revolution from to "4/5(4).   This book fills the gap in the literature of the French Revolution, and offers a synthesis which brings together the fruits of two generation's research in the field of French rural and agrarian history. George Lefebvre's contention that the peasantry occupied the centre-stage during the early years of the revolution is : P Jones. "The quality of its scholarly research and its perceptive comparisons make this the best work on the role of peasantry in the French Revolution from to " Choice "In this useful work of synthesis, P.M. Jones provides a timely critique of recent trends in the historiography of the peasantry in the French revolution." American Historical Price: $

The French peasantry in the seventeenth century () Kettering, Sharon. French Society: (). Hoffman, Philip T. Growth in a traditional society: the French countryside, (Princeton UP, ) Le Roy Ladurie, Emmanuel. The French Revolution created turmoil across the whole of Europe, via a series of events which continue to captivate and inspire massive debate. As such, there is a vast range of literature on the topic, much of it involving specific methodologies and approaches. The following selection combines introductory and general histories with a few more specialized : Thoughtco Editors. This book fills the gap in the literature of the French Revolution, and offers a synthesis which brings together the fruits of two generation's research in the field of French rural and agrarian George Lefebvre's contention that the peasantry occupied the centre-stage during the early years of the revolution is vindicated. The word "peasant" is derived from the 15th-century French word païsant, meaning one from the pays, or countryside; ultimately from the Latin pagus, or outlying administrative district.. Social position. Peasants typically made up the majority of the agricultural labour force in a pre-industrial majority of the people in the Middle Ages were peasants.

The peasantry in the French Revolution Jones, P. M. (Peter Michael), This book fills a gap in the literature on the French Revolution, and offers a synthesis which brings together the fruits of two generations' research in the field of French rural and agrarian history. Read this book on Questia. In the summer of , at about the same time that the citizens of Paris were assuring the victory of the Third Estate and the successful establishment of the National Assembly by resorting to violence on J the peasants of France were initiating a rebellion of their own directed against their seigneurs and the vestiges of the feudal regime. not the most interesting, part of the book. The preceding pages lay the setting for it. In Part I is de-scribed the process by which the povertv of the peasantry, the wan-dering elements of the population, and the frequent disturbances in the villages, which became increasingly disorderly as the Revolution. An excellent stab at one of the most complex events in world history: the French Revolution, which, of course, was actually a series of revolutions concatenated by historians. The best part of the book is the end, in which the author assesses the essence and legacy of the French Revolution(s) in clear and compelling terms/5.